Seward, Alaska

It’s winter on the East Coast but it sure doesn’t feel like it with the lack of cold temperatures and snow.  One place that’s definitely cold this time of year is Alaska.  If you’re fortunate to find yourself in our fine, frigid state of Alaska, you have to head down to Seward.  Seward is a fishing port in the southern part of the state.  It’s about a 3 hour drive from Anchorage.  Most visitors take a boat tour to see wildlife – whales, bear, sea otters, sea lions, sea birds – and glaciers.  If you want to something memorable, plan to go ice climbing on Exit Glacier.  My sister and I did and it’s something we’ll never forget.

We booked an ice climbing trip with Exit Glacier Guides for a 6-8 hour adventure.  Our guides, Julian and Cody, were so friendly, easy going and really knew their stuff.  These guys are experts and really made you feel comfortable and you knew you could trust them with your life because essentially that’s what you’re doing.

We hiked about 50 minutes to Exit Glacier then donned our gear and hiked on the crevasse fields of the glacier.  We learned how to climb on a training hill and then had 3 ice climbs in the crevasses.  You have to sit back and slowly walk over the edge of the ice and walk over the edge of the ice and down the ice wall till you get down to the bottom of the crevasse.

There was so much you get to see when you’re at the bottom of the crevasse that you can’t see from the surface.   Once you’re there it’s a totally different world.  It’s all white and blue.  Streams of water are rushing past you.  There are so many interesting formations.  You can’t hear anyone above you.  You can get lost down there. You’re challenging yourself.  Pushing your body to make it back up to the top.

It was a long day, 10 hours start to finish but afterwards you feel such a sense of accomplishment and awe.  I can’t wait to go back!


Exit Glacier (pic from Wikipedia)


Rock out with your crampons on


Exit Glacier


Exit Glacier


Going down


From the bottom of a moulin (a well or shaft in a glacier)

Check out more pics on my photo blog.  Go to Archives, August 2010.

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